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of the world are on the gaza strip for eight days. hamas rained rockets down on israel. the mullas shipped rockets to the sudan, sent them up into egypt before smuggling them in tunnels. israel responded by doing the only thing a responsible nation could do, it defended itself. now the united states needs to show there are consequences for attacking this sovereign nation, consequences for hamas and iran as well. we should have stricter enforcement of sanctions against iran. iran and hamas both need to be held accountable for these attacks. israel are the moral right and legal duty to defend itself from the barbarians, hamas. there is a cease-fire but only until hamas obtains more iranian missiles. hamas is the puppet and iran is the police departmentetteeer. the iranian regime need to go. the iranian people need to do away with the little guy in the desert, ahmadinejad. and that's the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the house will be in order. further requests for nute speeches? are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the gent
by -- met by some tough language from the security council. not from the government, israel or anyone. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that expe
this panel is syria. but what is happening in israel as we gather here this week? these are the questions of our time. these are the challenges of our generation and. that, i think, is one of the great benefits of opportunities like halifax, to have a very in- depth discussion on how we got as a community -- a community of democracies, a community of countries that care, are compassionate, and are able to do something to stop the slaughter of innocent civilians. >> there were many who say we need to have more young emerging democracies that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our c
be built. i spoke earlier today with the consulate general for the state of israel in philadelphia offering my support and concern for the unfortunate circumstances that are taking place in the middle east now in which hundreds of bombs have -- rockets have been shot at israel. some of its largest cities as the targets. and this is a matter in which obviously much high levels in our government, there have been communications and the assurance that israel has the right to defend itself. but i think that we can see in this russia trade agreement that if we can get to the point where there can be relationships that are built on self-interest and economic development, that we can put the weapons aside and move towards a circumstance in which people are focused on economic activity. we see in this crisis a circumstance that we hope will resolve itself. obviously we stand with our ally, but we also hope for a day in which peace will reign and economic opportunities. i agree with david dreier, really is a way in which eventually we can create a circumstance in which people will not have the necess
become particularly important to them, particularly support of israel. those issues have real resonance among pro-is really evangelicals. >> -- israeli evangelicals. >> jonathan has been covering the sector for a long time. thank you, ralph, for your comments. he is the money and politics reporter for bloomberg and also the president of the national press club. what did you see yesterday? >> in 2010 we saw all of this secret money in races and republicans took control of the senate and house. everyone said it would be a foreshadowing of 2012. it was not. obama was able to raise as much money as mitt romney. romney had help from political action committees and outside groups, but the money was even. obama was not swamped. he was able to match spending dollar for dollar. the difference was obama raise the money himself. ralph, you know how important it is to get people energized. if you give $10 to campaign, you will probably give it again in a couple of months. you will probably make a phone call. you'll probably tell your friends. he was able to call on donors again and again and was ab
of their force projection in the persian gulf into that conflict. i think there is hope that the u.s.-israel relationship is strong and open enough and the lines of communication are open up that it would not happen. one of the other things that if it may give a little positivity towards that is a concern that the nuclear facilities are so far in the ground that israel does not producing a satisfactory assault. they would need u.s. plant emissions to carry some of those weapons. perhaps that might give some hope there would be communication, if there is an attack down the line, that the two countries would be to work together and cordray. host: 3 more, go to foreignpolicy.com. thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. we will be back live tomorrow morning but lawmakers make their way back for the lame-duck session that begins today. we will be up there taking your calls and your comments and questions. thank you for watching today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite cor
was long and a piece of it like she might have for a traveler. all that stuff israel. if you had a phone with you, you could press a button and legal little trail there. when you showed up you could see that this is what people had done. that starts to be a compelling way of thinking how computers cancer to be more of a conduit of the lenses of your friends in the people you trust and anybody in the world rather than an internet connection with a screen on top of it. >> won the presuppositions of that is that you need a persistent identity that is attached to every person in your life. that has a memory. this thing has to be searchable and be in place over all the times in troops and things. -- and trips and things. do you see that identity or are you replicating something that is occurring in the real world? >> so phones are something you have with you all the time. you only have one phone and you do not share with people. your the one person who uses your phone unless you are sharing some 1's photograph. it contains all your information. the applications you use. facebook, we think abo
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7